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   Most decorated Rabbit! It won top two design awards.
 

Winning both the prestigious IDEA Award and the coveted GOOD DESIGN Award in 2001, the Rabbit Corkscrew may be the most decorated product design in its category.

Reported in the June 25 issue of Business Week, the Idea 2001 Awards were presented by the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA). The Rabbit was chosen as a winner by a panel of renowned industrial designers from thousands of international entries. It was one of only seven housewares products worldwide that earned awards for designers in the U.S., Switzerland and Sweden.

In December, 2001 the GOOD DESIGN Award, sponsored by the Chicago Athenaeum Museum, was given to the Rabbit as one of "The World's Best and Most Innovative New Product Designs." International in scope, the GOOD DESIGN Awards were judged in 2001 by a jury of leading Finnish designers convening in Helsinki.

Both awards were presented to the designer of the Rabbit Corkscrew, Ed Kilduff of Pollen Design, New York City. You'll find more information on the IDEA 2001 Awards at idsa.org and a complete list of GOOD DESIGN Awards at chi-athenaeum.org.


   Will the Rabbit Corkscrew become as popular as Bugs Bunny?
 

Winning both the prestigious IDEA Award and the coveted GOOD DESIGN Award in 2001, the Rabbit Corkscrew may be the most decorated product design in its category.

Reported in the June 25 issue of Business Week, the Idea 2001 Awards were presented by the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA). The Rabbit was chosen as a winner by a panel of renowned industrial designers from thousands of international entries. It was one of only seven housewares products worldwide that earned awards for designers in the U.S., Switzerland and Sweden.

In December, 2001 the GOOD DESIGN Award, sponsored by the Chicago Athenaeum Museum, was given to the Rabbit as one of "The World's Best and Most Innovative New Product Designs." International in scope, the GOOD DESIGN Awards were judged in 2001 by a jury of leading Finnish designers convening in Helsinki.

Both awards were presented to the designer of the Rabbit Corkscrew, Ed Kilduff of Pollen Design, New York City. You'll find more information on the IDEA 2001 Awards at idsa.org and a complete list of GOOD DESIGN Awards at chi-athenaeum.org.



"The Rabbit" pulls a cork in 3 seconds flat, then automatically removes the cork from the corkscrew.

Little did we know when we introduced the Rabbit Corkscrew a year ago that we were creating a rabbit character whose popularity might rival the fame of Bugs Bunny. Fact is "The Rabbit," as our phenomenal new corkscrew is affectionately called by its owners, has turned out to be a whopping, hopping success that is the talk of the wine business and America’s favorite new wine tool.

The acclaim started when The New York Times raved about the corkscrew with the "bunny profile," calling it "a foolproof device" for uncorking wine. The Wine Spectator, often called The Bible Of The Wine Industry, tested the Rabbit Corkscrew and had to admit being "impressed." Great reviews followed in Food & Wine. Playboy, Men’s Journal, the wine column of The San Francisco Chronicleand a host of other newspapers. "The Rabbit" was off and running and ready for its close-up on TV shows from coast to coast, including The Today Show.

 

What’s up, Doc? When the Rabbit Corkscrew does its job, what’s up is the cork.

The Rabbit Corkscrew can uncork a bottle of wine in three seconds. And that is about all the time it took catalog buyers to give it a collective bunny hug--and feature it in Chef's Catalog, The Wine Enthusiast, IWA Catalog  and a score of other national catalogs. The total number of catalogs "The Rabbit" appeared in during its first year was an astronomical 345,750,000. Bugs Bunny, eat your heart out!

There’s no denying that Bugs has an impressive presence in Warner Brothers Studio Stores around the country. But that hardly holds a bunny-shaped candle to the Rabbit Corkscrew’s presence in more than three thousand retail stores in the U.S. As Elmer Fudd would say, "What a wabbit!"


 

Our Rabbit Corkscrew has earned success by living up to its billing as "The Ultimate Cork-Pulling Machine." After promoting its fame heavily, with lots of print and TV ads, we can’t help wondering: Will "The Rabbit" be able to handle success? So far it’s pulled a few million corks with unflagging skill and patience. But only time will tell whether the Rabbit Corkscrew has the Right Stuff to eventually match the popularity of the indefatigable Bugs Bunny.


      A short course in wine openers
 

The earliest corkscrew dates back several centuries when corks were first used as bottle-stoppers. The basic corkscrew is a spiral wire (called a "worm") with a handle attached. The worm is turned into the cork, which is removed by pulling the handle up. The drawback of the basic corkscrew is that it provides no leverage. The cork must be pulled out by brute force, often with great difficulty. Subsequently mankind's ingenuity went to work improving on the basic corkscrew. In the U.S. alone hundreds of corkscrew patents were filed in the 19th century. (At the time corks were used as stoppers in bottles of whiskey, olive oil and other liquids as well as wine.) By 1900 three effective designs had emerged that still account for the great majority of corkscrews in use today.

The Bartender's Corkscrew: This design uses a fulcrum that engages the top edge of the wine bottle, to give leverage to the handle when pulling the cork. It's called the bartender's or waiter's corkscrew because it can be folded and carried in the pocket. It requires a sure hand and a lot of practice, however, to master its use. (For a pocket corkscrew that's easy to use, see Metrokane's Rabbit Zippity 2-Step Corkscrew.)

The Wing Corkscrew: This type is so-called because the handles on each side rise like wings when the worm is turned into the cork. After full insertion, the handles are pulled down to leverage the cork out. While a wing-type cork-screw will work well enough on some corks, its design requires a thick, augur-like metal worm, which can crumble or even destroy a fragile cork. Metrokane has overcome this problem with the revolutionary Rabbit Wing Corkscrew, a corkscrew with a gear shift. For details return to the Wine Tools & Glasses page.

The Self-Pulling Corkscrew: More than a century old, this design consists of a basic corkscrew fitted into a guide. After the worm has been inserted into the cork, the user continues turning in the same direction, and the "stop" action of the guide forces the cork to pull itself out. (Thus "self-pulling"). With a metal worm, the friction between the cork and worm make the self-pulling action difficult for most corks, impossible for tight ones. It was not until 1978 that this problem was surmounted by Herbert Allen, a Texan oil expert who applied his drilling knowhow to the self-pulling corkscrew. Allen reduced the friction between cork and worm so dramatically that the self-pulling action became almost effortless. His new corkscrew design was soon recognized as the most effective device yet for pulling a cork. Scroll down wine tools page to see Metrokane's Velvet Corkscrew, an elegant self-pulling design named for its soft-as-velvet finish.

The ultimate cork-pulling machine--The Rabbit™ Corkscrew: The original device of this type was invented by the same man, Herbert Allen, who perfected the self-pulling corkscrew. Metrokane applied similar mechanical principles to develop the Rabbit Corkscrew, which was introduced in 2000. The Rabbit has two gripping handles that latch onto the top of a wine bottle and a top handle that drives the corkscrew into the cork and pops it out in three seconds flat. With another quick movement of the top handle the cork is ejected from the corkscrew. The Rabbit is comprised of 31 separate parts assembled into a powerful, high-tech tool. Its ergonomic design and velvet feel make it a pleasure to operate. For more about the Rabbit Corkscrew return to the Wine Tools & Glasses page.